The debate about tent companies as event planners

December 1, 2007

Some tent rental companies are adding event planning to their services. Is this a good move? By Carla Waldemar Should a tent rental company take on the role of event planner? These days that’s morphed from speculation into reality. It’s practical, some say. Others contend that practicality is precisely what gets lost in translation. But …

Inflatables insurance premiums could decrease

October 1, 2007

Insurance companies are coming around to lower prices for inflatables premiums. Renting inflatables can be an excellent source of revenue for a rental company, but the profits can come at a high cost. A few years ago, insurance was not just expensive: It was difficult to find carriers that would even insure the units. Today, …

Solving seasonal labor problems

How companies manage the ebb and flow of tent-rental labor. By Jamie Swedberg If you ask around, most tent rental companies can probably tell you what their state’s or province’s minimum wage is. They’ll have to think about it, though. They certainly haven’t paid it in a while. The labor market is far too tight, …

The role of the crew chief

August 1, 2007

Crew chiefs do more than just make sure a tent is installed correctly—they’re the employees you can’t afford to lose. By Holly O’Dell Anyone running a business these days will tell you that good help is hard to find. Owners of tent rental companies regularly face this conundrum in hiring and keeping high-quality workers, particularly …

Strong vendor-planner partnerships lead to profit

June 1, 2007

When event planners and their vendors develop good working relationships, profits will follow. By Stacy Stern, CSEP As our industry evolves with new equipment and ideas, there is—and always will be—one consistency: the vendor-client relationship. Often, vendors’ best clients are event planners. “A good planner or producer can make your job easier if she knows …

The HIRE Act and capital expenditures

In addition to providing tax breaks for hiring unemployed people, the newly–passed HIRE Act extends the 2008 and 2009 expensing thresholds so that businesses can write off up to $250,000 of certain capital expenditures, subject to a phase–out once expenditures exceed $800,000, in lieu of depreciating those costs over time. Qualifying property is defined as …